Contributors

About
  • Author, Persian
    Nima Yushij (1897–1960) was born in the small town of Yush in the northern province of Mazandaran in Iran. He is known as the father of Modern Persian Poetry and is possibly the most influential Iranian poet of the twentieth century.
  • Author, Arabic
    Muhammad Zafzaf (1945–2001) was regarded as one of Morocco’s foremost novelists and poets. He lived in Casablanca, and his work includes short stories, novels, poems, and plays, in addition to translations from French and Spanish. He received the Grand Atlas Prize in 1998.
  • Translator, Czech
    Andrée Collier Záleská is a Czech translator focusing on women writers. She earned an MA in Russian and East European Studies from Harvard University, and is currently translating the work of Czech women writers of the 1968 generation. Her work has been published in Partisan Review, Chicago Review, and Salt Hill, among others; and in anthologies from Catbird Press and MIT Press.
  • Author, Italian
    Andrea Zanzotto (1921–2011) is widely considered one of the most important poets in Europe. His many works include IX Ecloghe (IX Eclogues), Sull’altopiano: racconti e prose 1942–1954 (On the upland plain: stories and other writings 1942–1954), La beltà (Beauty), Pasque (Easters), Il Galateo in bosco (A woodland book of manners), Idioma (Idiom), and Sovrimpressioni (Superimpressions).
  • Author, Chinese
    Zhang Zao was a nationally known Chinese contemporary poet whose work blended Eastern and Western influences. A respected translator, literary critic, and scholar of literature and philosophy, he died in 2010 in Tübingen, the town where Hölderlin once lived, at the age of forty-eight.
  • Author, Arabic
    Ghassan Zaqtan is a Palestinian poet, novelist, playwright, and editor. Born in Beit Jala, near Bethlehem, he is a strong supporter of the Palestinian liberation movement. In 2013, his collection of poetry, Like a Straw Bird It Follows Me, translated by Fady Joudah, was awarded the Griffin Poetry Prize, and Palestinian president Mahmoud Abbas awarded him the National Medal of Honor for his many contributions to Palestinian literature.
  • Author, Persian
    Behzad Zarrinpour is one of the most notable contemporary avant-garde poets in Iran. Zarrinpour was born in 1968 in the city of Khorramshahr, Iran. He was an editor of Zan Daily, an arts and literature magazine banned in 1999, and of Asia Daily, banned in 2003.
  • Translator
    Bill Zavatsky has published translations of Robert Desnos and Valery Larbaud (with Ron Padgett) in the Random House Book of Twentieth-Century French Poetry, of Ramón Gómez de la Serna's Greguerías, and of André Breton (with Zack Rogow) in Earthlight. He has also published numerous collections of his own poetry.
  • Author
    Xu Zechen is the author of the novels Midnight’s Door, Night Train, and Heaven on Earth. He was selected by People’s Literature as one of the “Future 20” best Chinese writers under forty-one. The recipient of numerous awards and honors, he lives in Beijing.
  • Author, Turkish
    Necmi Zekâ, born in 1963, is a leading representative of the new Turkish avant-garde poetry. His unconventional poems make extensive use of irony and playfulness. In a faux-naïf style, he creates experimental compositions that mock literary and social clichés.
  • Author, Japanese
    Konparu Zenchiku (1405–1468, 1470, or 1471) was a skilled Japanese Noh actor, troupe leader, and playwright.
  • Author, Albanian
    Moikom Zeqo is the author of more than a dozen books of poetry and fiction, as well as numerous monographs on Albanian history and literature. He has served as Albania’s Minister of Culture, and for many years he directed the National Historical Museum in Tirana.
  • Author, Ukrainian
    Serhiy Zhadan is one of Ukraine’s most prominent contemporary writers, the author of numerous novels and poetry collections, the winner of several prestigious international awards, and a translator of poetry from several languages. Zhadan is also well-known for his political activism.
  • Translator, Buryat
    Sayan Zhambalov is a Buryat writer, actor, and singer. He performed with the Yara Arts Group and heads Uragsha, a traditional music ensemble that has performed at the World Music Insitute in New York.
  • Author, Chinese
    A poet, curator, and art critic, Zhu Zhu was born in Yangzhou, the People’s Republic of China. His paced and painterly poems cut into social reality through the lens of personal history and meditation, where the interiority of the mind is pooled, pulled, and brought to the brink of possibility.
  • Author, Chinese
    Xu Zhuodai (1881–1958) was born Xu Fulin in Wuxian, Jiangsu. He helped to form the Spring Willow Society, staging modern drama, and co-founded the Kaixin Film Company. He also published the best-selling novel Where Can We Run?
  • Translator, Hindi
    Arlene Zide has a PhD from the University of Chicago and is the author of In Their Own Voice: An Anthology of Contemporary Indian Women Poets. Her translations from Hindi and other Indian languages have appeared in Indian Literature, The Malahat Review, International Quarterly, and Translation Review.
  • Author, Latvian
    Imants Ziedonis (1933 – 2013) was a Latvian poet who first rose to fame during the Soviet occupation of Latvia. Following Latvian independence from the Soviet Union, Ziedonis was awarded the Order of the Three Stars, Latvia's highest honor for civic merit to the nation.
  • Translator, Italian
    Seth Zimmerman is a professor of mathematics at Evergreen Valley College in San Jose, California, where his rendering of the Inferno is used as a Humanities text. It is supported in the language arts lab by his computer program HyperDante, which provides line by line translation, footnotes, diagrams, summaries, and artwork. His previous published works include fiction, poetry, and research in probability theory.
  • Translator, Spanish
    As an undergraduate, Martin Zotta assisted Richard Kostelanetz in the production of Simultaneous Translations (Cornerstone Press, Arnold, MO, 2008), in which Ramon’s famously short, single-sentence texts appear directly above English translations typeset to be identical in horizontal length.