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Forrest Gander was born in the Mojave Desert and grew up, for the most part, in Virginia. Trenchant periods of his life were spent in San Francisco, Dolores Hidalgo (Mexico), and Eureka Springs, Arkansas. With degrees in both geology and English literature, Gander is the author of numerous books of poetry, translation, fiction, and essays. He’s the A.K. Seaver Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature at Brown University. A U.S. Artists Rockefeller fellow, Gander has been recipient of grants from the NEA, the Guggenheim, Howard, Witter Bynner and Whiting foundations. His 2011 collection Core Samples from the World was an NBCC and Pulitzer Prize finalist for poetry, and his 2018 collection Be With won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry and was longlisted for the National Book Award.
Translator
Jeffrey Angles is a professor at Western Michigan University. His Japanese-language poetry collection, Watashi no hizukehenkōsen (My International Date Line) won the highly coveted Yomiuri Prize for Literature in 2017, making him the first non-native speaker ever to win this award for poetry. He is also the award-winning translator of dozens of Japan’s most important writers. His most recent translation is of the modernist novel The Book of the Dead by Orikuchi Shinobu.
Translator
Natascha Bruce translates fiction from Chinese. Her work includes short stories by Hong Kong surrealist writer Dorothy Tse, Lonely Face by Singapore's Yeng Pway Ngon and, with Nicky Harman, A Classic Tragedy by Xu Xiaobin.
Translator
Jennifer Croft is the recipient of Fulbright, PEN, Tin House, MacDowell, and National Endowment for the Arts grants and fellowships, as well as the inaugural Michael Henry Heim Prize for Translation. She holds a PhD from Northwestern University and an MFA from the University of Iowa and is a founding editor of The Buenos Aires Review.
Editor
Boris Dralyuk is a literary translator and the Executive Editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books. He holds a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures from UCLA, where he taught Russian literature for a number of years. He is the translator of several volumes from Russian and Polish, including, most recently, Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry and Odessa Stories.  He is also the editor of 1917: Stories and Poems from the Russian Revolution, and co-editor, with Robert Chandler and Irina Mashinski, of The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry.
Translator
Shelley Frisch holds a doctorate in German literature from Princeton University. She is the author of The Lure of the Linguistic and translator of numerous books from the German, including biographies of Nietzsche, Einstein, and Kafka, for which she was awarded the 2007 Modern Language Association Translation Prize for a Scholarly Study of Literature. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey.
Translator
Emily Goedde's translations and essays have been published or are forthcoming in the anthologies “The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to World Literature,” “Nimrod’s Collected Works and Jade Mirror: Women Poets of China,” as well as in Pathlight: New Chinese Writing, The Iowa Review, harlequin creature, Translation Review and The Asian American’s Writers Workshop Transpacific Literary Project. She was named Princeton University’s Translator in Residence for the spring 2019 semester. Goedde earned a master’s in fine arts degree in literary translation from the University of Iowa and a doctoral degree in comparative literature from the University of Michigan.
Author
Ezio Neyra is a Peruvian writer, scholar, editor, and translator. His writing has appeared in Cuba, Chile, Mexico, the United States, and Peru. He is the author of  Habrá que hacer algo mientras tanto (2005),  Todas mis muertes (2006), Tsunami (2012), and Pasajero en La Habana (2017). A recipient of several fellowships and recognitions and a participant in book fairs worldwide, he has been a writer-in-residence in Mexico City and Rhodes, Greece. In 2003, he founded Matalamanga, a publishing house based in Lima that has published over 30 books by Latin American authors. He was the editor of the Peruvian edition of the Argentinean literary magazine Lamujerdemivida. In Lima he also founded and directed Niñolee, an organization promoting literacy among Peruvian children. He holds a PhD in Latin American Literature at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. He also worked for the Peruvian government as Director del Libro y la Lectura, where he had in charge the promotion of reading and of the book industry.  Currently, he is living in Santiago, Chile, where he is a professor or Literature at the Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez.
Translator
Mui Poopoksakul is a lawyer turned translator with a special interest in contemporary Thai literature. She is the translator of Prabda Yoon’s The Sad Part Was and Moving Parts, both from Tilted Axis Press. She is translating a novel and a story collection by Duanwad Pimwana, both forthcoming in 2019 from Two Lines Press and Feminist Press, respectively. A native of Bangkok who spent two decades in the U.S., she now lives in Berlin, Germany.
Michael Reynolds is editor in chief at Europa Editions. He is the author of a collection of short stories entitled Sunday Special, and a book for young readers entitled La notte di Q and illustrated by Brad Holland. He is the editor of 1989, an anthology of ten European writers illustrated by Henning Wagenberth. For Europa Editions his translations include three volumes in Carlo Lucarelli’s De Luca series, children’s fiction by Wolf Erlbruch and Altan, and Daniele Mastrogiacomo’s Days of Fear.
Translator
Aaron Robertson has written for various publications including The New York Times, The Nation, n+1, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and more, and he is currently an editor at Literary Hub. He won a 2018 PEN/Heim grant for his translation of Igiaba Scego's Beyond Babylon.
Translator
Olivia E. Sears is the founder of the Center for the Art of Translation and served as editor of Two Lines for twelve years. She is a translator from Italian.
Editor
Declan Spring is Vice President, Senior Editor, and Director of Foreign Rights at New Directions. He received his BA in English from University of Rochester and his MA in English from NYU. He has been working at New Directions since 1991.
Director
Amy Stolls is the Director of Literary Arts at the National Endowment for the Arts. Her publishing credits include the young adult novel Palms to the Ground (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), winner of the 2005 Parents' Choice Gold Award, and the novel The Ninth Wife (HarperCollins, 2011), as well as numerous personal and literature-related essays. For the NEA, she co-edited the anthology The Art of Empathy: Celebrating Literature in Translation; wrote the introduction to NEA Literature Fellowships: 40 Years of Supporting American Writers, and co-wrote the chapter on literature in the book National Endowment for the Arts, A History: 1965-2008. Prior to her time at the NEA, Stolls was an environmental journalist who gained international recognition for her coverage of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. She has an MFA in creative writing from American University, where she has taught courses on contemporary literature.
Translator
Jeremy Tiang has translated novels by Yeng Pway Ngon, Li Er, Zhang Yueran, Su Wei-Chen, and Chan Ho-Kei; and non-fiction by Yu Qiuyu and Jackie Chan. He also writes and translates plays, and is the author of It Never Rains on National Day and State of Emergency, which won the Singapore Literature Prize. Jeremy is the Managing Editor of Pathlight magazine and a member of the translation collective Cedilla & Co. He lives in Brooklyn.
September 25, 2019

Third Annual Day of Translation Co-presented with the Alan Cheuse International Writers Center

Fenwick Library | George Mason University | 4400 University Drive | Fairfax, Virginia

This event has already taken place.

Join us for our third annual Day of Translation co-presented with the Alan Cheuse International Writers Center. All panels and events will take place at the Fenwick Library on the George Mason University campus in Fairfax, Virginia.

All events are free and open to the public.

Writers and translators appearing include Jeffrey Angles, Natascha Bruce, Jennifer Croft, Boris Dralyuk, Shelley Frisch, Emily Goedde, Ezio Neyra, Mui Poopoksakul, Michael Reynolds, Aaron Robertson, Olivia Sears, Amy Stolls, and Jeremy Tiang, among others. Forrest Gander will deliver the keynote address.

 

Nonfiction in Translation

10:30-11:45 am

Jennifer Croft, Boris Dralyuk, Shelley Frisch, and Emily Goedde

 

Breaking Boundaries: Representation in Translation

12:00 noon-1:15 pm

Matthew Davis, Ezio Neyra, Mui Poopoksakul, and Aaron Robertson

 

Contemporary Literature from Asia

3:00-4:15 pm

Jeffrey Angles, Natascha Bruce, Mui Poopoksakul, and Jeremy Tiang

 

Trends in Translation Publishing

4:15-5:30 pm

Michael Holtmann (Two Lines Press), Michael Reynolds (Europa Editions), Olivia Sears (Two Lines Press), Declan Spring (New Directions), and Amy Stolls (National Endowment for the Arts)

 

Keynote Address: Forrest Gander

7:00 pm

Contact:
Leslie-Ann Woofter
415.512.8812
Forrest Gander was born in the Mojave Desert and grew up, for the most part, in Virginia. Trenchant periods of his life were spent in San Francisco, Dolores Hidalgo (Mexico), and Eureka Springs, Arkansas. With degrees in both geology and English literature, Gander is the author of numerous books of poetry, translation, fiction, and essays. He’s the A.K. Seaver Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature at Brown University. A U.S. Artists Rockefeller fellow, Gander has been recipient of grants from the NEA, the Guggenheim, Howard, Witter Bynner and Whiting foundations. His 2011 collection Core Samples from the World was an NBCC and Pulitzer Prize finalist for poetry, and his 2018 collection Be With won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry and was longlisted for the National Book Award.
Translator
Jeffrey Angles is a professor at Western Michigan University. His Japanese-language poetry collection, Watashi no hizukehenkōsen (My International Date Line) won the highly coveted Yomiuri Prize for Literature in 2017, making him the first non-native speaker ever to win this award for poetry. He is also the award-winning translator of dozens of Japan’s most important writers. His most recent translation is of the modernist novel The Book of the Dead by Orikuchi Shinobu.
Translator
Natascha Bruce translates fiction from Chinese. Her work includes short stories by Hong Kong surrealist writer Dorothy Tse, Lonely Face by Singapore's Yeng Pway Ngon and, with Nicky Harman, A Classic Tragedy by Xu Xiaobin.
Translator
Jennifer Croft is the recipient of Fulbright, PEN, Tin House, MacDowell, and National Endowment for the Arts grants and fellowships, as well as the inaugural Michael Henry Heim Prize for Translation. She holds a PhD from Northwestern University and an MFA from the University of Iowa and is a founding editor of The Buenos Aires Review.
Editor
Boris Dralyuk is a literary translator and the Executive Editor of the Los Angeles Review of Books. He holds a PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures from UCLA, where he taught Russian literature for a number of years. He is the translator of several volumes from Russian and Polish, including, most recently, Isaac Babel’s Red Cavalry and Odessa Stories.  He is also the editor of 1917: Stories and Poems from the Russian Revolution, and co-editor, with Robert Chandler and Irina Mashinski, of The Penguin Book of Russian Poetry.
Translator
Shelley Frisch holds a doctorate in German literature from Princeton University. She is the author of The Lure of the Linguistic and translator of numerous books from the German, including biographies of Nietzsche, Einstein, and Kafka, for which she was awarded the 2007 Modern Language Association Translation Prize for a Scholarly Study of Literature. She lives in Princeton, New Jersey.
Translator
Emily Goedde's translations and essays have been published or are forthcoming in the anthologies “The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to World Literature,” “Nimrod’s Collected Works and Jade Mirror: Women Poets of China,” as well as in Pathlight: New Chinese Writing, The Iowa Review, harlequin creature, Translation Review and The Asian American’s Writers Workshop Transpacific Literary Project. She was named Princeton University’s Translator in Residence for the spring 2019 semester. Goedde earned a master’s in fine arts degree in literary translation from the University of Iowa and a doctoral degree in comparative literature from the University of Michigan.
Author
Ezio Neyra is a Peruvian writer, scholar, editor, and translator. His writing has appeared in Cuba, Chile, Mexico, the United States, and Peru. He is the author of  Habrá que hacer algo mientras tanto (2005),  Todas mis muertes (2006), Tsunami (2012), and Pasajero en La Habana (2017). A recipient of several fellowships and recognitions and a participant in book fairs worldwide, he has been a writer-in-residence in Mexico City and Rhodes, Greece. In 2003, he founded Matalamanga, a publishing house based in Lima that has published over 30 books by Latin American authors. He was the editor of the Peruvian edition of the Argentinean literary magazine Lamujerdemivida. In Lima he also founded and directed Niñolee, an organization promoting literacy among Peruvian children. He holds a PhD in Latin American Literature at Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. He also worked for the Peruvian government as Director del Libro y la Lectura, where he had in charge the promotion of reading and of the book industry.  Currently, he is living in Santiago, Chile, where he is a professor or Literature at the Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez.
Translator
Mui Poopoksakul is a lawyer turned translator with a special interest in contemporary Thai literature. She is the translator of Prabda Yoon’s The Sad Part Was and Moving Parts, both from Tilted Axis Press. She is translating a novel and a story collection by Duanwad Pimwana, both forthcoming in 2019 from Two Lines Press and Feminist Press, respectively. A native of Bangkok who spent two decades in the U.S., she now lives in Berlin, Germany.
Michael Reynolds is editor in chief at Europa Editions. He is the author of a collection of short stories entitled Sunday Special, and a book for young readers entitled La notte di Q and illustrated by Brad Holland. He is the editor of 1989, an anthology of ten European writers illustrated by Henning Wagenberth. For Europa Editions his translations include three volumes in Carlo Lucarelli’s De Luca series, children’s fiction by Wolf Erlbruch and Altan, and Daniele Mastrogiacomo’s Days of Fear.
Translator
Aaron Robertson has written for various publications including The New York Times, The Nation, n+1, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and more, and he is currently an editor at Literary Hub. He won a 2018 PEN/Heim grant for his translation of Igiaba Scego's Beyond Babylon.
Translator
Olivia E. Sears is the founder of the Center for the Art of Translation and served as editor of Two Lines for twelve years. She is a translator from Italian.
Editor
Declan Spring is Vice President, Senior Editor, and Director of Foreign Rights at New Directions. He received his BA in English from University of Rochester and his MA in English from NYU. He has been working at New Directions since 1991.
Director
Amy Stolls is the Director of Literary Arts at the National Endowment for the Arts. Her publishing credits include the young adult novel Palms to the Ground (Farrar, Straus & Giroux), winner of the 2005 Parents' Choice Gold Award, and the novel The Ninth Wife (HarperCollins, 2011), as well as numerous personal and literature-related essays. For the NEA, she co-edited the anthology The Art of Empathy: Celebrating Literature in Translation; wrote the introduction to NEA Literature Fellowships: 40 Years of Supporting American Writers, and co-wrote the chapter on literature in the book National Endowment for the Arts, A History: 1965-2008. Prior to her time at the NEA, Stolls was an environmental journalist who gained international recognition for her coverage of the Exxon Valdez oil spill. She has an MFA in creative writing from American University, where she has taught courses on contemporary literature.
Translator
Jeremy Tiang has translated novels by Yeng Pway Ngon, Li Er, Zhang Yueran, Su Wei-Chen, and Chan Ho-Kei; and non-fiction by Yu Qiuyu and Jackie Chan. He also writes and translates plays, and is the author of It Never Rains on National Day and State of Emergency, which won the Singapore Literature Prize. Jeremy is the Managing Editor of Pathlight magazine and a member of the translation collective Cedilla & Co. He lives in Brooklyn.