Two Lines Journal
Share
| All Journal Posts >
placeholder

Speck of Dust

เศษธุลี
by Chiranan Pitpreecha
Translated from Thai by
Noh Anothai

ฉัน คือกรวดเม็ดน้อย

ซ่อนสีเศร้าสร้อย หมองหม่น

ใต้เศษเขียวตะไคร่ในวังวน

ประกอบปนสายน้ำเป็นลำธาร

มีความเหงาเยียบเย็นเป็นที่อยู่

วันวันรับรู้การไหลผ่าน

เสียงกระซิบซ้ำซ้ำท่องตำนาน

เล่าเหตุการณ์ต้นทางอย่างคุ้นชิน

จึงรู้ว่าโลกนี้มีเขาเขียว

มีป่าเปลี่ยว ทุ่งหญ้า มีผาหิน

มีหมู่บ้าน ผู้คน บนพื้นดิน

ก่อนธารินจะไหลไปนคร

 

 

ระยิบน้ำระยับรับพยับแดด

ใบไม้แสดลอยเรื่อยมาเหนื่อยอ่อน

เห็นยางเลือดละลายสายเซาะซอน

และนั่นท่อนศพท่องล่องรางธาร!

ใบไม้มีรอยพรุนกระสุนศึก

ในน้ำลึกมีร่องโลหิตฉาน

เสียงลึกลับขับฟ้องร้องพยาน

และเนิ่นนานนับแต่นั้น…ฉันสุดทน

 

!?!?!

 

ฉันคือกรวดเม็ดร้าว

แหลกแล้วด้วยความเศร้า หมองหม่น

ปราถนาเป็นธุลีทุรน

ดีกว่าทนกลั้นใจอยู่ใต้น้ำ

 


 

I am a little shard of rock,

hiding my colors in sadness beneath

shreds of green algae, here where the currents

converge to form a single stream.

 

Lonely and cold, the place where I live,

taking in the detritus of every day,

the same low tones retelling the legends

of what lies between the headwaters and here.

 

So I know in this world are green mountains,

silent woods, fields of grass, rocky cliffs;

there are men and their homes on earth’s surface

before the river reaches the city at last.

 

 

Gleaming of water with sunlight’s last glimmer,

leaves dyed with sunset litter the stream,

as trickles of blood dissolve in the splashing

and there on the current—a body’s remains.

 

The leaves are holed with artillery wounds;

with carnage the deepest water glares.

Above all, a strange voice crying out, bearing witness;

after ages of this, I can’t take anymore.

 

!?!

 

I am a little shard of rock

splitting open in sadness. And better

that I be ground into a speck of dust

than suffocate here underwater!

 

(Recognized by PEN International–Thailand, January 1981)

 

___

Pitpreecha, Chiranan. ใบไม้ที่หายไป (The leaf that went missing). Bangkok: Aan Thai Press, 1989.

placeholder
Chiranan Pitpreecha was one of the most prominent student activists of Thailand’s October 14th era, a period of mass, university student-led demonstrations against the military dictatorship. Her collectionใบไม้ที่หายไป (The leaf that went missing) (1989), which documents her years as political activist, won the Southeast Asian Writers (SEAWrite) Award.
Translator
Noh Anothai’s translations range from classical Siamese poetry to contemporary Thai essays and fiction. He has given talks at the Siam Society and the Center for Translation at Chulalongkorn University, both in Bangkok, and taught creative writing in Chiangrai, Thailand. He is a PhD student in Comparative Literature, Track for International Writers, at Washington University in St. Louis.