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Additional Information
ISBN: 978-1931883832
Pages: 464
Size: 6 x 9
Publication Date: May 14, 2019
Distributed By: Publishers Group West
Author
Igiaba Scego, born in Rome in 1974 to a family of Somali origins, is a writer and journalist. She is the author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, and her memoir La mia casa è dove sono won Italy’s prestigious Mondello Prize. She is a frequent contributor to the magazine Internazionale and the supplement to La Repubblica, Il Venerdì di Repubblica.
Translator
Aaron Robertson has written for The Nation, Detroit Metro Times, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Point Magazine, and in 2018 he reported for The New York Times as a James Reston Fellow. He won the PEN/Heim Grant for his translation of Igiaba Scego’s Beyond Babylon.
Other Contributor
Jhumpa Lahiri received the Pulitzer Prize in 2000 for Interpreter of Maladies, her debut story collection. She is also the author of The Namesake, Unaccustomed Earth, and The Lowland, a finalist for both the Man Booker prize and the National Book Award in fiction.

Beyond Babylon

by Igiaba Scego
Translated from Italian by
Aaron Robertson
$19.50 $22.95

“[Scego] gives voice to multiple lives, experiences, and emotions either silenced or ignored by history. [Beyond Babylon] resembles no other Italian novel to have migrated thus far into English.” — from Jhumpa Lahiri’s introduction

An epic for an era of migrants, border-crossings, and traumatic conflicts, Beyond Babylon takes us deep into the lives of people swept up in history. Telling the engrossing stories of two half-sisters who meet coincidentally in Tunisia, their mothers, and the elusive father who ties them all together, Igiaba Scego’s virtuosic novel spreads thickly over Argentina’s horrific dirty war, the chaotic final years of Siad Barre’s brutal dictatorship Somalia—which ended in catastrophic civil war—and the modern-day excesses of Italy’s right-wing politics.

Offering a visionary new perspective on political upheaval and identity in the 21st century, Beyond Babylon’s kaleidoscopic plot investigates the ways in which we make ourselves. Its myriad characters, locations, and languages redefine our sense of citizenship for a fast-changing world of migrants and demagogues, all anchored by five poignant individuals fighting to overcome memories of past violations. A masterwork equally as adept with the lives of nations as those of human beings, Beyond Babylon brings much-needed insight, compassion, and understanding to our turbulent world.

Praise

“[Beyond Babylon] grows out of novels like Hanif Kureishi’s The Buddha of Suburbia, Zadie Smith’s White Teeth, Danzy Senna’s Caucasia: urban, coming-of-age novels written by young writers growing up with double perspectives, with the challenge of constructing a hybrid identity.”— from Jhumpa Lahiri’s introduction

“A prolific writer of novels, short stories, and essays for Italian newspapers and magazines, Scego belongs to a group of contemporary authors of African descent who have been articulating fraught dynamics of belonging to Italian society and literature.” — Public Books

“Igiaba Scego is one of the most prominent voices of a new cohort of black writers in Italy.” — Africa Is a Country

Beyond Babylon is an illuminating, courageous novel in which the word becomes flesh and the writing mimics the melodic, syncopated rhythms of jazz, Bossa nova, the Somali hello, and salsa. It is a densely woven work in which languages are no longer barriers. Standard Italian and slang is deftly interspersed with Somali, Spanish, Arabic, and English. Riffing off the theme of dictatorship, in the illustrious spirit of Nuruddin Farah, the book feints between memory and the redeeming power of words. In this multi-protagonist story, colors and genres blend to reveal the consequences of violence and oppression on the bodies of men and women alike.” — Ubah Cristina Ali Farah, author of Little Mother

Author
Igiaba Scego, born in Rome in 1974 to a family of Somali origins, is a writer and journalist. She is the author of numerous works of fiction and nonfiction, and her memoir La mia casa è dove sono won Italy’s prestigious Mondello Prize. She is a frequent contributor to the magazine Internazionale and the supplement to La Repubblica, Il Venerdì di Repubblica.
Translator
Aaron Robertson has written for The Nation, Detroit Metro Times, The Los Angeles Review of Books, and The Point Magazine, and in 2018 he reported for The New York Times as a James Reston Fellow. He won the PEN/Heim Grant for his translation of Igiaba Scego’s Beyond Babylon.
Other Contributor
Jhumpa Lahiri received the Pulitzer Prize in 2000 for Interpreter of Maladies, her debut story collection. She is also the author of The Namesake, Unaccustomed Earth, and The Lowland, a finalist for both the Man Booker prize and the National Book Award in fiction.