Writers & Translators

Writers & Translators
  • Author, Turkish
    Melih Cevdet Anday (March 13, 1915–November 28, 2002) was a Turkish writer whose unique poetry stands outside the traditional literary movements. His work has been translated into Russian, Danish, German, Hungarian, Romanian, and English.
  • Translator, French
    Alison Anderson’s translations include Europa Editions’ The Elegance of the Hedgehog by Muriel Barbery, and works by Nobel laureate J. M. G. Le Clézio. She has also written two novels and is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Literary Translation Fellowship. She has lived in Greece and Croatia, and speaks several European languages, including Russian.
  • Translator, Chinese
    Hil Anderson, a native of Georgia, has lived in Taiwan researching contemporary Chinese poetry. He has a joint degree from Harvard University and Georgetown Law Center.
  • Translator, French
    J. Bradford Anderson holds a PhD in Comparative Literature from Yale University, writes on twentieth-century U.S. and Latin American literature, and teaches English at the Trinity School in New York City. He lives in Astoria, New York.
  • Translator, Chinese, French, Spanish
    Kirk Anderson is an independent translator of Spanish, French, and Chinese. He has published translations of more than fifty writers from more than twenty different countries, including Pedro Almodóvar’s Patty Diphusa and Other Writings, For Rushdie: Essays by Arab and Muslim Writers in Defense of Free Speech, as well as works by Juan Miguel Asensi, Fernando Durán Ayanegui, José Luis Garci, José Luis Sampedro, Abdellatif Laabi, Su Ton, and Zhong Ling, among others.
  • Translator, Galician
    Neil Anderson is a teacher and translator living in Savannah, Georgia. His translations of Galician poetry have appeared in journals such as M–Dash, Asymptote, Drunken Boat, Pleiades, The Literary Review, Circumference, and Waxwing.
  • Author, Spanish
    Enrique Anderson-Imbert (1910–2000) was an Argentine novelist, short-story writer, and literary critic. Anderson-Imbert graduated from the University of Buenos Aires. He was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 1954 and became the first Victor S. Thomas Professor of Hispanic Literature at Harvard University in 1965, where he remained until his retirement in 1980. He was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1967. Anderson-Imbert is best known for his brief “microcuentos,” in which he blends fantasy and magical realism.
  • Translator, Spanish
    Chris Andrews was born in Newcastle, Australia, in 1962. As well as translating books by Roberto Bolaño and César Aira for New Directions, he has published a critical study (Poetry and Cosmogony: Science in the Writing of Queneau and Ponge, Rodopi, 1999) and a collection of poems (Cut Lunch, Indigo, 2002).
  • Author, French
    Georges Anglade was born in Haiti and emigrated in the 1960s to France. He was actively opposed to the government of François Duvalier and was subsequently imprisoned for his outspokenness when he returned to the island in 1974. An accomplished poet, he founded the Haitian chapter of PEN in 2008. He briefly served as Haiti’s Minister of Public Works, Transport, and Communication from 1995–1996 before returning to his life as a professor in Canada. He was visiting family in Haiti when the January 2010 earthquake hit and was killed.
  • Translator, Japanese
    Jeffrey Angles is a professor at Western Michigan University. His Japanese-language poetry collection, Watashi no hizukehenkōsen (My International Date Line) won the highly coveted Yomiuri Prize for Literature in 2017, making him the first non-native speaker ever to win this award for poetry. He is also the award-winning translator of dozens of Japan’s most important writers. His most recent translation is of the modernist novel The Book of the Dead by Orikuchi Shinobu.
  • Author, Persian-Dari
    Nadia Anjuman was an Afghani poet and the author of Gul-e-dodi (Dark Flower) and Yek Sàbad Délhoreh (An Abundance of Worry). A gifted student of literature at Herat University, she died in November 2005 at the age of twenty-five after being physically assaulted by her husband.
  • Translator
    Roberta Antognini is Associate Professor and Chair of Italian at Vassar College. She has a Laurea in History of Italian Language from the Università Cattolica di Milano (Italy) and a PhD in Italian from New York University. Prior to her arrival at Vassar, she was an adjunct Professor at Columbia University and Fordham University. Together with Deborah Woodard, she has translated the collection of poems Hospital series by Amelia Rosselli (New York, New Directions: 2015).
  • Translator, Arabic
    Sinan Antoon’s poems, essays, and translations have appeared in Aljazeera.com, The New York Times, The Nation, Journal of Arabic Literature, The Massachusetts Review, World Literature Today, and Ploughshares, among others. He is the author of The Baghdad Blues (2007) and the translator of Mahmoud Darwish’s The Presence of Absence (2011) and a selection of Iraqi poet Saadi Youssef’s late work, Nostalgia; My Enemy (2012).
  • Author, Swedish
    Johannes Anyuru is a poet, novelist, and playwright. He debuted in 2003 with the critically acclaimed collection of poems Only The Gods Are New. They Will Drown in Their Mothers' Tears was awarded the August Prize and film rights have been acquired by Momento Film. Anyuru's work has been likened to a mix between Nobel Laureate Thomas Tranströmer and a hip-hop MC.
  • Author, Turkish
    Pir Sultan Aptal is a legendary Sufi poet. The poet’s name means “The Saint Sultan Dervish.” He lived in the late fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries in central Anatolia, where he wrote many of his verses. His subjects are several; he wrote on lyrical and pastoral themes, as well as devoutly religious verses. Most fatally, his work called out for rights and freedoms for the people governed by the cruel and rapacious Ottoman governors. One of those governors, Hizar Pasha, finally caught and hung Pir Sultan Aptal.
  • Translator, German
    Ronnie Apter is a poet, translator of both poetry and opera, and associate professor of English at Central Michigan University. She has written numerous articles and Digging for the Treasure, a book discussing Ezra Pound’s contribution to the translation of poetic forms into English.
  • Author, Spanish
    José Manuel Arango (1937–2002) was born in El Carmen de Viboral, a village named for its poisonous snakes, in northwest Columbia. He was a poet, translator, editor, and philosopher.
  • Author, Spanish
    Sigfredo Ariel (born in 1962) is a Cuban poet born in Santa Clara. He is also a scriptwriter, musical producer, and director of television and radio programs. He was musical consultant for Wim Wenders’s popular film Buena Vista Social Club (1999) and edited UNEAC’s music magazine. His drawings and designs have illustrated magazines and books and have appeared on record covers and posters. He has published numerous books of poetry, most recently the poetry anthology Ahora mismo un puente (2012). He lives in Havana.
  • Author, Spanish
    Rene Ariza (1940–1994) was a Cuban writer, playwright, actor, and director. Jailed in 1974 for his political views against the Castro regime, he was released to the U.S. in 1979.
  • Author, Persian
    Nahid Arjouni is an Iranian poet with a master's degree in Psychology. She lives in Sanandaj, the Kurdistan region of Iran. She has three poetry books, published in Iran and Arbil. Nahid’s poetry is very well known for its exploration of femininity and war in the Middle East.