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Clarice Lispector was born in 1920 to a Jewish family in western Ukraine. As a result of the anti-Semitic violence they endured, the family fled to Brazil in 1922, and Clarice Lispector grew up in Recife. Following the death of her mother when Clarice was nine, she moved to Rio de Janeiro with her father and two sisters, and she went on to study law. With her husband, who worked for the foreign service, she lived in Italy, Switzerland, England, and the United States, until they separated and she returned to Rio in 1959; she died there in 1977. Since her death, Clarice Lispector has earned universal recognition as Brazil’s greatest modern writer.
Translator
Idra Novey is a novelist, poet, and translator. She is the award-winning author of the novels Those Who Knew and Ways to Disappear. Her work has been translated into ten languages and she's translated numerous authors from Spanish and Portuguese, most recently Clarice Lispector. For her poetry and translation she has received awards from the PEN Translation Fund, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Poetry Foundation. She lives in Brooklyn with her family.
Author
Hector Tobar is the author of three books, including the novel The Barbarian Nurseries published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and named a New York Times Notable Book. For two decades he's worked for the Los Angeles Times: as a city reporter, national and foreign correspondent (on assignments from from East Los Angeles to Iraq), and was part of the reporting team that won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the 1992 L.A. riots. He is also the author of Translation Nation: Defining a New American Identity in the Spanish-Speaking United States and The Tattooed Soldier, a novel, which was a finalist for the PEN USA West award for fiction.
Micheline Aharonian Marcom has published five novels, including a trilogy of books about the Armenian genocide and its aftermath in the 20th century. She has received fellowships and awards from the Lannan Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, and the US Artists’ Foundation. Her first novel, Three Apples Fell from Heaven, was a New York Times Notable Book and Runner-Up for the PEN/Hemingway Award for First Fiction. Her second novel, The Daydreaming Boy, won the PEN/USA Award for Fiction.
Translator
Katrina Dodson is from San Francisco and has previously lived in Rio de Janeiro, most recently as a Fulbright scholar. She is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, and her writing has appeared in McSweeney’s Quarterly, and Qui Parle.
Editor
CJ Evans is the author of A Penance (New Issues Press) and The Category of Outcast and received the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship and a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship.
October 15, 2013

The Genius of Clarice Lispector

Hotel Rex | San Francisco, CA

This event has already taken place.

We collaborated with Litquake to celebrate that rare literary genius that was Clarice Lispector.

Blending the stream of conscious lyricism of Virginia Woolf with the dark, existential themes of Franz Kafka, Lispector’s novels have experienced a recent renaissance with four new translations, published last year to wide acclaim. Here, we paired two of Lispector’s translators with two acclaimed writers for a deep exploration of the infamous life and dazzling work of one of the 20th century’s great innovators.

Panelists: Idra Novey, Hector Tobar, Micheline Aharonian Marcom, and Katrina Dodson. Moderated by Two Lines Editor CJ Evans.

Clarice Lispector was born in 1920 to a Jewish family in western Ukraine. As a result of the anti-Semitic violence they endured, the family fled to Brazil in 1922, and Clarice Lispector grew up in Recife. Following the death of her mother when Clarice was nine, she moved to Rio de Janeiro with her father and two sisters, and she went on to study law. With her husband, who worked for the foreign service, she lived in Italy, Switzerland, England, and the United States, until they separated and she returned to Rio in 1959; she died there in 1977. Since her death, Clarice Lispector has earned universal recognition as Brazil’s greatest modern writer.
Translator
Idra Novey is a novelist, poet, and translator. She is the award-winning author of the novels Those Who Knew and Ways to Disappear. Her work has been translated into ten languages and she's translated numerous authors from Spanish and Portuguese, most recently Clarice Lispector. For her poetry and translation she has received awards from the PEN Translation Fund, the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Poetry Foundation. She lives in Brooklyn with her family.
Author
Hector Tobar is the author of three books, including the novel The Barbarian Nurseries published by Farrar, Straus and Giroux and named a New York Times Notable Book. For two decades he's worked for the Los Angeles Times: as a city reporter, national and foreign correspondent (on assignments from from East Los Angeles to Iraq), and was part of the reporting team that won a Pulitzer Prize for coverage of the 1992 L.A. riots. He is also the author of Translation Nation: Defining a New American Identity in the Spanish-Speaking United States and The Tattooed Soldier, a novel, which was a finalist for the PEN USA West award for fiction.
Micheline Aharonian Marcom has published five novels, including a trilogy of books about the Armenian genocide and its aftermath in the 20th century. She has received fellowships and awards from the Lannan Foundation, the Whiting Foundation, and the US Artists’ Foundation. Her first novel, Three Apples Fell from Heaven, was a New York Times Notable Book and Runner-Up for the PEN/Hemingway Award for First Fiction. Her second novel, The Daydreaming Boy, won the PEN/USA Award for Fiction.
Translator
Katrina Dodson is from San Francisco and has previously lived in Rio de Janeiro, most recently as a Fulbright scholar. She is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at the University of California at Berkeley, and her writing has appeared in McSweeney’s Quarterly, and Qui Parle.
Editor
CJ Evans is the author of A Penance (New Issues Press) and The Category of Outcast and received the Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship and a Poetry Society of America Chapbook Fellowship.