Two Lines Journal
Share
| All Journal Posts >
placeholder

Night Ponderings

ปรัชญาราตรี
by Chiranan Pitpreecha
Translated from Thai by
Noh Anothai

มือดำของราตรีขยี้ฟ้า

บีบดาราแตกร่วงช่วงโชติแสง

ริมขอบหล้าเคยมีริ้วสีแดง

เริ่มแพ้แรงระบายคล้ำตามทำนอง

 

เมื่ออาทิตย์ท่องไปไกลลับลิบ

ฟ้าค่อยหยิบจันทรามาแก้หมอง

แสงนวลนายทาบเห็นเพ็ญลำยอง

เพลงดาวร้องรับแผ่วดังแว่วมา

 

ขอปลอบขวัญทุกคนที่ล้นทุกข์

ด้วยแววสุกสกาวใสในเวหา

จะกล่อมเกลาชาวดินทุกวิญญาณ์

ให้เย็นตาเติมยิ้มอิ่มอารมณ์

 

โรยดาราดารดาษฝาดฟ้าหมึก

ห้วงหาวลึกความลี้ลับยิ่งทับถม

ซ้อนสายใยใสจางทางน้ำนม

คล้ายคลี่ห่มอจินไตยในเอกภพ

 

อีกลีลาลำนำธรรมชาติ

ผืนฟ้าพาดแสงพราว-ดาวสยบ

จุดสว่างวูบวับแล้วดับลบ

ดาวหางจบทางพร่าพริบตานั้น

 

…เฉกชีพเชิดเจิดจ้าแจ่มราศี

ก็เช่นนี้ใช่ไหม? เคยใฝ่ฝัน

คืนนี้เห็นดาวหางดับโดยฉับพลัน

หัวใจหวั่นพรั่นเร้น…กลัวเป็น”ดาว”

 


 

The black hand of night wrings out the sky,

squeezing out sparks, shards of stars, fragments aglow.

Along the sky’s rim had shone a line of red

that’s now given way to darker hues.

 

Once the sun has wandered out of sight,

the night sets the moon out in its place

and underneath its cool, gentle light,

a chorus of stars rises in song:

 

Let us soothe everyone burdened with care

in this, this clear light from above;

and sing all souls asleep that wander the earth

so hearts may know fullness, if only just once.

 

Fleck the inky face of night with stars

so that the void seems not to yawn so deep;

weave strands of empathy into the Milky Way,

tucking in the inscrutables of the universe.

 

Another one of nature’s wonders:

across the sheet of sky the stars grow still.

A single point flares up and then is gone

—in the blink of an eye, a comet’s career.

 

So, too, a life that’s set ablaze with glory—

runs like this, right? I used to dream of having one.

Tonight, I saw a shooting star burn out

and shook, afraid someday to be a star.

 

(1971)

 

___

Pitpreecha, Chiranan. ใบไม้ที่หายไป (The leaf that went missing). Bangkok: Aan Thai Press, 1989.

placeholder
Chiranan Pitpreecha was one of the most prominent student activists of Thailand’s October 14th era, a period of mass, university student-led demonstrations against the military dictatorship. Her collectionใบไม้ที่หายไป (The leaf that went missing) (1989), which documents her years as political activist, won the Southeast Asian Writers (SEAWrite) Award.
Translator
Noh Anothai’s translations range from classical Siamese poetry to contemporary Thai essays and fiction. He has given talks at the Siam Society and the Center for Translation at Chulalongkorn University, both in Bangkok, and taught creative writing in Chiangrai, Thailand. He is a PhD student in Comparative Literature, Track for International Writers, at Washington University in St. Louis.