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Translator
Michael Day is a traveler, writer, and translator from Chinese and Japanese based in Mexico City, though originally from the American Midwest. His recent work has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books China Channel,Chicago Quarterly ReviewStructoSaint Ann’s Review, and Words Without Borders. He was joint winner of the 2015 Bai Meigui Prize for Chinese to English literary translation. 
Translator
Canaan Morse is a literary translator and poet, currently pursuing a Ph.D in imperial Chinese literature at Harvard. His translations of poems by Yang Xiaobin, He Qifang, and several other poets have been published in Kenyon Review, The Baffler, Asymptoteand elsewhere.
March 12, 2020 | 7:00pm

Calico Launch Party

Churchill’s The Office | 194 Church Street | San Francisco, California

This event has already taken place.

In March 2020, Two Lines Press will launch a new book series dedicated to capturing vanguard works of translated literature—curated around a particular theme, region, language, historical moment, or style—in vibrant, collectible editions.

We’re calling it Calico. 

Join us for a Calico celebration at Churchill’s The Office! Michael Day and Canaan Morse will read from their translations. Plus, you’ll hear more about our new book series from editor Sarah Coolidge and have ample time to converse and conspire with fellow Bay Area readers. As always, refreshments will be provided.

The first Calico book, That We May Live: Speculative Chinese Fiction, collects seven short stories from mainland China and Hong Kong, all of them erring on the side of the strange, the speculative. Government mushroom housing? It’s got it. Uncanny fermented grandma teas? Oh yeah. An aging newscaster engaged in an illicit affair with her boss, who just so happens to get off to her reading the news? Why, but of course.

In a country where the government provides one narrative while real life is often very different, That We May Live showcases how the speculative provides cover from which Chinese writers can challenge the government’s story and explore their own—and just how difficult it can be to discern reality from absurdity, comedy from horror. With works from previously untranslated writers and rising stars of international literature—all translated by some of the best Chinese translators around—in addition to being delightfully absorbing, can be thoughtfully uncomfortable reading experience when you look for the truths at the stories’ surreal edges.”

That We May Live features work from Dorothy Tse (translated by Natasha Bruce), Enoch Tam (translated by Jeremy Tiang), Zhu Hui (translated by Michael Day), Chan Chi Wa (translated by Audrey Heijns), Chen Si’an (translated by Canaan Morse) and Yan Ge (translated by Jeremy Tiang).

We’re excited. We hope you are too.

 

Contact:
Leslie-Ann Woofter
415.512.8812
Translator
Michael Day is a traveler, writer, and translator from Chinese and Japanese based in Mexico City, though originally from the American Midwest. His recent work has appeared in the Los Angeles Review of Books China Channel,Chicago Quarterly ReviewStructoSaint Ann’s Review, and Words Without Borders. He was joint winner of the 2015 Bai Meigui Prize for Chinese to English literary translation. 
Translator
Canaan Morse is a literary translator and poet, currently pursuing a Ph.D in imperial Chinese literature at Harvard. His translations of poems by Yang Xiaobin, He Qifang, and several other poets have been published in Kenyon Review, The Baffler, Asymptoteand elsewhere.