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Lesley Nneka Arimah was born in the UK and grew up in Nigeria and wherever her father was stationed for work. She emigrated from Nigeria to Louisiana at the age of thirteen, a disorienting transition that left her keenly attuned to the shockwaves set in motion by displacement. The powerful stories in her first book, What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, embrace magical realism while employing a deeply empathetic understanding of character and place. Arimah has been a finalist for a National Magazine Award and the Caine Prize, and a winner of the African Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and an O. Henry Award, among other honors. She lives in Minneapolis.
Carolina De Robertis is the translator of Bonsai, by Alejandro Zambra (Melville House, 2008), and other works published in Granta, Zoetrope: All-Story, and The Virginia Quarterly Review. She is also the author of the award-winning, internationally bestselling novel The Invisible Mountain. Her second novel, Perla, was published by Knopf in 2012.
Author
Laleh Khadivi is the author of The Age of Orphans, The Walking, and the A Good Country. She has been awarded a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and an NEA Literature Fellowship. She has also worked as a director, producer, and cinematographer of documentary films. Her debut film, 900 Women, aired on A&E and premiered at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival. Khadivi teaches at the University of San Francisco’s MFA program.
Pajtim Statovci moved from Kosovo to Finland with his family when he was two years old. His debut novel, My Cat Yugoslavia, relates the inner conflict and questions about one’s identity that immigration, homosexuality, and the past might stir. Statovci won the Helsingin Sanomat Literature Prize in the category Best Debut. Pajtim Statovci studies comparative literature at the University of Helsinki, and screenwriting at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
Michael Holtmann has worked in the arts for more than fifteen years. Prior to joining the Center, he held positions at the National Endowment for the Arts and the Folger Shakespeare Library. He serves on the board of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and the international programming committee of the Bay Area Book Festival.
June 4, 2017 | 2:00pm - 3:15pm

Living in Two Worlds: Crossing Borders and Identities to Create Home

The Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life| 2121 Allston Way | Berkeley, California

This event has already taken place.

We all cross borders, whether geographical, emotional, or even digital. In our current age, humans are more mobile, and displaced, than they have ever been. These celebrated border-crossers and novelists have spent a great deal of time contemplating a life between the lines. How do we stay grounded in a world that’s constantly in flux? With Lesley Nneka Arimah (What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky), Carolina De Robertis (The Gods of Tango), Laleh Khadivi (A Good Country), and Pajtim Statovci (My Cat Yugoslavia). Moderated by our very own Michael Holtmann.

Sponsored by the Center for the Art of Translation, the Barbro Osher Pro Suecia Foundation, FILI – Finnish Literature Exchange, and Finlandia Foundation National.

You can find more information about the Bay Area Book Fest and a full schedule here.

Purchase tickets here.

 

Contact:
Leslie-Ann Woofter
415.512.8812
Lesley Nneka Arimah was born in the UK and grew up in Nigeria and wherever her father was stationed for work. She emigrated from Nigeria to Louisiana at the age of thirteen, a disorienting transition that left her keenly attuned to the shockwaves set in motion by displacement. The powerful stories in her first book, What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky, embrace magical realism while employing a deeply empathetic understanding of character and place. Arimah has been a finalist for a National Magazine Award and the Caine Prize, and a winner of the African Commonwealth Short Story Prize, and an O. Henry Award, among other honors. She lives in Minneapolis.
Carolina De Robertis is the translator of Bonsai, by Alejandro Zambra (Melville House, 2008), and other works published in Granta, Zoetrope: All-Story, and The Virginia Quarterly Review. She is also the author of the award-winning, internationally bestselling novel The Invisible Mountain. Her second novel, Perla, was published by Knopf in 2012.
Author
Laleh Khadivi is the author of The Age of Orphans, The Walking, and the A Good Country. She has been awarded a Whiting Award, a Pushcart Prize, and an NEA Literature Fellowship. She has also worked as a director, producer, and cinematographer of documentary films. Her debut film, 900 Women, aired on A&E and premiered at the Human Rights Watch Film Festival. Khadivi teaches at the University of San Francisco’s MFA program.
Pajtim Statovci moved from Kosovo to Finland with his family when he was two years old. His debut novel, My Cat Yugoslavia, relates the inner conflict and questions about one’s identity that immigration, homosexuality, and the past might stir. Statovci won the Helsingin Sanomat Literature Prize in the category Best Debut. Pajtim Statovci studies comparative literature at the University of Helsinki, and screenwriting at Aalto University School of Arts, Design and Architecture.
Michael Holtmann has worked in the arts for more than fifteen years. Prior to joining the Center, he held positions at the National Endowment for the Arts and the Folger Shakespeare Library. He serves on the board of the American Literary Translators Association (ALTA) and the international programming committee of the Bay Area Book Festival.