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Author
Pablo Neruda was a Chilean poet-diplomat and politician born Ricardo Eliécer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto. His Veinte poemas de amor y una cancion desesperada (Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair) made a celebrity of Neruda. In 1927, Neruda began his long career as a diplomat in the Latin American tradition of honoring poets with diplomatic assignments. Neruda’s career integrated private and public concerns, and he became known as the people’s poet. He received numerous prestigious awards, including the International Peace Prize in 1950, the Lenin Peace Prize and the Stalin Peace Prize in 1953, and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971. In 1973, just twelve days after the defeat of Chile’s democratic regime, Neruda died of cancer in Santiago, Chile.
Forrest Gander was born in the Mojave Desert and grew up, for the most part, in Virginia. Trenchant periods of his life were spent in San Francisco, Dolores Hidalgo (Mexico), and Eureka Springs, Arkansas. With degrees in both geology and English literature, Gander is the author of numerous books of poetry, translation, fiction, and essays. He’s the A.K. Seaver Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature at Brown University. A U.S. Artists Rockefeller fellow, Gander has been recipient of grants from the NEA, the Guggenheim, Howard, Witter Bynner and Whiting foundations. His 2011 collection Core Samples from the World was an NBCC and Pulitzer Prize finalist for poetry, and his 2018 collection Be With won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry and was longlisted for the National Book Award.
Translator
William O’Daly, a poet, translator, and editor, has published eight volumes of the late-career and posthumous poetry of Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda, and a chapbook of poems, with Copper Canyon Press. O’Daly was a finalist for the 2006 Quill Award in Poetry and was profiled on The Today Show. A National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, his poems, translations, essays, and reviews have appeared in a wide range of domestic and international journals. With co-author Han-ping Chin, he recently completed a historical novel, This Earthly Life, based in China’s Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. He has been awarded national and regional honors for literary editing and instructional design.
Caroline Bracken’s poems have been widely published including in The Irish Times Hennessy New Irish Writing (2016), Skylight 47, The Clare Champion, The WOW Anthology, and The Gathering Poem. She won the iYeats International Poetry Competition (2015) and the Writing.ie/Anam Cara International Poetry Competition (2013). Other poems have been shortlisted in competitions such as the Bridport (UK) and Listowel. She has been nominated for a 2016 Forward Prize in the Best Single Poem Category. Caroline also writes plays which have been staged at various venues around Ireland. She was recently selected by Words Ireland for a Mentorship Scheme and was awarded a bursary to attend the John Hewitt Summer School in 2015.
Stephen Connolly is a postgraduate student in the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University.
Stephen Sexton is a PhD student in the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. His poems have recently appeared, or are forthcoming, in Poetry London, Poetry Ireland Review, and as part of The Lifeboat reading series. In 2012 he was the winner of the inaugural Funeral Services Northern Ireland National Poetry Competition. His pamphlet, Oils, will be published by the Emma Press.
Author
Paul McVeigh's debut novel, The Good Son, won The Polari Prize and The McCrea Literary Award. It was shortlisted for The Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award, The Guardian’s "Not The Booker" Prize and a finalist for The People’s Book Prize. It is currently shortlisted for the Prix du Roman Cezam in France. Paul McVeigh currently lives in Belfast.
Author
Achy Obejas is a writer, journalist and translator. She is the author of five books of fiction and has translated Junot Díaz and Wendy Guerra, among many others. She is from Cuba and lives in California.
Veronica Scott Esposito has worked in the field of translated literature for over a decade. She specializes in Latin American and Mitteleuropan literature.
Translator
Stephen Kessler is a poet, prose writer, translator, and editor. He is the author of ten books and chapbooks of original poetry, sixteen books of literary translation, and three collection of essays. His translations have appeared in such magazines as Agni, New American Writing, and The American Poetry Review, among others. He lives in Santa Cruz, California.
Educator
Ramón Saldívar, professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Hoagland Family Professor of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama in 2012. He is Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Studies, and has served as Chair of the Department of English and the Department of Comparative Literature at Stanford University.
Author
Jaap Scholten made his debut in 1995 with his successful and acclaimed novel Tachtig (Eighty). From then on he devoted himself entirely to writing, including work for television. His second novel Morgenster (Morning Star), about the 1977 train hijack in Drenthe by Moluccan separatists, was published in 2001. Scholten has lived in Hungary for several years, where he writes columns and letters that appear in NRC Handelsblad and other publications. De wet van Spengler (Spengler’s Law) is his long-awaited third novel.
Ana Martins Marques has published two books of poetry: A vida submarina (Scriptum, 2009) and Da arte das armadilhas (Companhia das Letras, 2011), which won the Brazilian Prêmio Biblioteca Nacional and the Prêmio Alphonsus Guimaraens.
Translator
Elisa Wouk Almino is the associate editor at Hyperallergic. She is also a translator of poetry and fiction from Portuguese.
Nicola Lagioia, born in Bari in 1973, is an editor for the Italian publisher Minimum Fax. He is the author of three novels and a collection of short stories. His books have been awarded the Strega Prize, the Premio Volponi, and the Premio Viareggio, among others. He lives in Rome. Ferocity is his English-language debut.
Author
Niña Weijers studied literary theory in Amsterdam and Dublin. She has published short stories, essays and articles in various literary magazines, such as Das MagazinDe Gids and De Revisor. She is a regular contributor to the weekly magazine De Groene Amsterdammer, and an editor of De Gids. Her debut novel The Consequences (De consequenties) was published in May 2014. It won the Anton Wachter Prize 2014 for best first novel, the Opzij Feminist Literature Prize, the Lucy B. & C.W. van der Hoogt Prize, and was shortlisted for the Libris Prize and the Golden Boekenuil, the two most important Dutch and Flemish literary awards.
Karolina Ramqvist is one of the most influential writers and feminists of her generation in Sweden. She had her breakthrough in 2009 with the critically acclaimed book The Girlfriend and in 2015 she was awarded the prestigious P.O. Enquist Literary Prize for her latest novel The White City. In 2014, Ramqvist made her screenwriting debut with the award-winning short film Cupcake. She lives in Stockholm with her husband and three children.
Author
Merle Kröger is a novelist, script writer, and film producer living in Berlin, Germany. She produces art films and documentaries for international arthouse cinema. She also writes scripts for independent cinema in India. Since 2003, Kröger has published four novels, which combine documentary research, personal history, and political analysis with elements of crime literature. For Grenzfall (2012) and Havarie (Collision) (2015), she received the German Crime Novel Award. Collision will be published in November 2017 by Unnamed Press.
Filmmaker
Philip Scheffner, born 1966 in Homburg/Saar, lives and works as an artist and filmmaker in Berlin. Together with Merle Kröger, Alex Gerbaulet and Caroline Kirberg he runs the production platform pong. He took part in the Berlinale Forum with Havarie (2016), And-Ek Ghes… (2016), Revision (2012), Der Tag des Spatzen (2010), and The Halfmoon Files (2007).
October 9, 2017 - October 13, 2017

Words Around the World: Litquake’s International Week

Multiple venues | San Francisco, California

This event has already taken place.

This brand-new series of programs—from tributes to readings, discussions, and even a film screening—brings world-class authors and translators to the Litquake festival for an unparalleled five nights of world literature. Our aim is to broaden cultural understanding, and make these international voices more accessible to Bay Area readers and communities. Enrich your reading palette with this wide variety of writers and translated works from around the globe.

October 9-13 at various venues in San Francisco. Click each link for tickets and more information.

OCTOBER 9
7-9 pm, Swedish American Hall, Odin Room
The Infinite Man: A Celebration of Pablo Neruda. With writer/translators Forrest Gander, William O’Daly, Jessica Powell, and Mark Eisner. 

OCTOBER 10
7-9 pm, Swedish American Hall, Odin Room
A State of Mind: Contemporary Writing from Ireland. With poets Caroline Bracken, Stephen Connolly, and Stephen Sexton. Hosted by Renee Richardson and Irish Greg McQuaid, and live music from Eoin Harrington and South Centra.

OCTOBER 10
6:30-7:30 pm, Latino Room, San Francisco Public Library
Fifty Years of One Hundred Years of Solitude: A Tribute to Gabriel Garcia Marquez. With Achy Obejas, Scott Esposito, Stephen Kessler, and Ramón Saldívar.

OCTOBER 11
7-9 pm, Swedish American Hall, Odin Room
Some Stories Deserve to be True: International Nonfiction. With Mateo Hoke, Andrew Lam, Jaap Scholten, and moderator Ingrid Rojas Contreras. 

OCTOBER 12
7-9 pm, Swedish American Hall, Odin Room
Brazilian Literature in Translastion. With Elisa Wouk Almino, Brenda Hillman, Sebastião Edson Macedo, David Shook, Dr. Karen Sotelino, and live Brazilian music.

OCTOBER 13
6-8:30 pm, Alamo Drafthouse at the New Mission
The European Refugee Crisis: Havarie and the Art of Slow Cinema. Screening, with Havarie director Philip Scheffner and adaptation author Merle Kröger.

OCTOBER 13
7-9 pm, Swedish American Hall, Odin Room
Longform Fiction from Europe. With Dominique Fabre, Nicola Lagioia, Nina Weijers, Karolina Ramqvist, and moderator John McMurtrie.

 

These events are supported in part by grants from the San Francisco Arts Commission and from San Francisco Grants for the Arts.

 

Contact:
Leslie-Ann Woofter
415.512.8812
Author
Pablo Neruda was a Chilean poet-diplomat and politician born Ricardo Eliécer Neftalí Reyes Basoalto. His Veinte poemas de amor y una cancion desesperada (Twenty Love Poems and a Song of Despair) made a celebrity of Neruda. In 1927, Neruda began his long career as a diplomat in the Latin American tradition of honoring poets with diplomatic assignments. Neruda’s career integrated private and public concerns, and he became known as the people’s poet. He received numerous prestigious awards, including the International Peace Prize in 1950, the Lenin Peace Prize and the Stalin Peace Prize in 1953, and the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1971. In 1973, just twelve days after the defeat of Chile’s democratic regime, Neruda died of cancer in Santiago, Chile.
Forrest Gander was born in the Mojave Desert and grew up, for the most part, in Virginia. Trenchant periods of his life were spent in San Francisco, Dolores Hidalgo (Mexico), and Eureka Springs, Arkansas. With degrees in both geology and English literature, Gander is the author of numerous books of poetry, translation, fiction, and essays. He’s the A.K. Seaver Professor of Literary Arts and Comparative Literature at Brown University. A U.S. Artists Rockefeller fellow, Gander has been recipient of grants from the NEA, the Guggenheim, Howard, Witter Bynner and Whiting foundations. His 2011 collection Core Samples from the World was an NBCC and Pulitzer Prize finalist for poetry, and his 2018 collection Be With won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry and was longlisted for the National Book Award.
Translator
William O’Daly, a poet, translator, and editor, has published eight volumes of the late-career and posthumous poetry of Chilean Nobel laureate Pablo Neruda, and a chapbook of poems, with Copper Canyon Press. O’Daly was a finalist for the 2006 Quill Award in Poetry and was profiled on The Today Show. A National Endowment for the Arts Fellow, his poems, translations, essays, and reviews have appeared in a wide range of domestic and international journals. With co-author Han-ping Chin, he recently completed a historical novel, This Earthly Life, based in China’s Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution. He has been awarded national and regional honors for literary editing and instructional design.
Caroline Bracken’s poems have been widely published including in The Irish Times Hennessy New Irish Writing (2016), Skylight 47, The Clare Champion, The WOW Anthology, and The Gathering Poem. She won the iYeats International Poetry Competition (2015) and the Writing.ie/Anam Cara International Poetry Competition (2013). Other poems have been shortlisted in competitions such as the Bridport (UK) and Listowel. She has been nominated for a 2016 Forward Prize in the Best Single Poem Category. Caroline also writes plays which have been staged at various venues around Ireland. She was recently selected by Words Ireland for a Mentorship Scheme and was awarded a bursary to attend the John Hewitt Summer School in 2015.
Stephen Connolly is a postgraduate student in the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry at Queen’s University.
Stephen Sexton is a PhD student in the Seamus Heaney Centre for Poetry. His poems have recently appeared, or are forthcoming, in Poetry London, Poetry Ireland Review, and as part of The Lifeboat reading series. In 2012 he was the winner of the inaugural Funeral Services Northern Ireland National Poetry Competition. His pamphlet, Oils, will be published by the Emma Press.
Author
Paul McVeigh's debut novel, The Good Son, won The Polari Prize and The McCrea Literary Award. It was shortlisted for The Authors’ Club Best First Novel Award, The Guardian’s "Not The Booker" Prize and a finalist for The People’s Book Prize. It is currently shortlisted for the Prix du Roman Cezam in France. Paul McVeigh currently lives in Belfast.
Author
Achy Obejas is a writer, journalist and translator. She is the author of five books of fiction and has translated Junot Díaz and Wendy Guerra, among many others. She is from Cuba and lives in California.
Veronica Scott Esposito has worked in the field of translated literature for over a decade. She specializes in Latin American and Mitteleuropan literature.
Translator
Stephen Kessler is a poet, prose writer, translator, and editor. He is the author of ten books and chapbooks of original poetry, sixteen books of literary translation, and three collection of essays. His translations have appeared in such magazines as Agni, New American Writing, and The American Poetry Review, among others. He lives in Santa Cruz, California.
Educator
Ramón Saldívar, professor of English and Comparative Literature and the Hoagland Family Professor of Humanities and Sciences at Stanford University, was awarded the National Humanities Medal by President Barack Obama in 2012. He is Bass University Fellow in Undergraduate Studies, and has served as Chair of the Department of English and the Department of Comparative Literature at Stanford University.
Author
Jaap Scholten made his debut in 1995 with his successful and acclaimed novel Tachtig (Eighty). From then on he devoted himself entirely to writing, including work for television. His second novel Morgenster (Morning Star), about the 1977 train hijack in Drenthe by Moluccan separatists, was published in 2001. Scholten has lived in Hungary for several years, where he writes columns and letters that appear in NRC Handelsblad and other publications. De wet van Spengler (Spengler’s Law) is his long-awaited third novel.
Ana Martins Marques has published two books of poetry: A vida submarina (Scriptum, 2009) and Da arte das armadilhas (Companhia das Letras, 2011), which won the Brazilian Prêmio Biblioteca Nacional and the Prêmio Alphonsus Guimaraens.
Translator
Elisa Wouk Almino is the associate editor at Hyperallergic. She is also a translator of poetry and fiction from Portuguese.
Nicola Lagioia, born in Bari in 1973, is an editor for the Italian publisher Minimum Fax. He is the author of three novels and a collection of short stories. His books have been awarded the Strega Prize, the Premio Volponi, and the Premio Viareggio, among others. He lives in Rome. Ferocity is his English-language debut.
Author
Niña Weijers studied literary theory in Amsterdam and Dublin. She has published short stories, essays and articles in various literary magazines, such as Das MagazinDe Gids and De Revisor. She is a regular contributor to the weekly magazine De Groene Amsterdammer, and an editor of De Gids. Her debut novel The Consequences (De consequenties) was published in May 2014. It won the Anton Wachter Prize 2014 for best first novel, the Opzij Feminist Literature Prize, the Lucy B. & C.W. van der Hoogt Prize, and was shortlisted for the Libris Prize and the Golden Boekenuil, the two most important Dutch and Flemish literary awards.
Karolina Ramqvist is one of the most influential writers and feminists of her generation in Sweden. She had her breakthrough in 2009 with the critically acclaimed book The Girlfriend and in 2015 she was awarded the prestigious P.O. Enquist Literary Prize for her latest novel The White City. In 2014, Ramqvist made her screenwriting debut with the award-winning short film Cupcake. She lives in Stockholm with her husband and three children.
Author
Merle Kröger is a novelist, script writer, and film producer living in Berlin, Germany. She produces art films and documentaries for international arthouse cinema. She also writes scripts for independent cinema in India. Since 2003, Kröger has published four novels, which combine documentary research, personal history, and political analysis with elements of crime literature. For Grenzfall (2012) and Havarie (Collision) (2015), she received the German Crime Novel Award. Collision will be published in November 2017 by Unnamed Press.
Filmmaker
Philip Scheffner, born 1966 in Homburg/Saar, lives and works as an artist and filmmaker in Berlin. Together with Merle Kröger, Alex Gerbaulet and Caroline Kirberg he runs the production platform pong. He took part in the Berlinale Forum with Havarie (2016), And-Ek Ghes… (2016), Revision (2012), Der Tag des Spatzen (2010), and The Halfmoon Files (2007).